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If you are an

Employee

Here you will find information on the applicable social insurance if, as an employee, you move to or take up work in one or several Nordic countries.

Social Insurance

Here you will find information on the applicable social insurance if, as an employee, you move to or take up work in one or several Nordic countries.

Social security

Persons working in another EU/EEA country or Switzerland are usually entitled to the same social security and benefits as the citizens in the country of work. Employees moving to the Nordic countries are primarily subject to the same rules as employees moving to another EU/EEA country. The family members of employees are also entitled to family benefits and healthcare benefits from the country of work, regardless of which Member state they reside in.

Living and working in the same country within the Nordic countries

If you move or have moved to another country within the Nordic countries to live and work there, you are normally covered by the social insurance of that country. The regulations, types of benefit and benefit rates vary from country to country.

Living in one country and working in another country within the Nordic countries

If you live in one country and work in another within the Nordic region, you are normally covered by the legislation in the country where you are employed and will be entitled to social security benefits from that country, providing you do not also work in the country where you live or work in more than one country. The regulations, types of benefit and benefit rates vary from one country to the next.

Working in two different countries within the Nordic countries and living in one of them

If you work in two different countries within the Nordic region and live in one of them, you are normally subject to the laws of the country where you live and will be entitled to social security benefits from that country. The regulations, types of benefit and benefit rates vary between countries. 

Posting

If, for a limited time period, you are posted to another Nordic country by your employer to carry out work in that country on behalf of your employer, you will normally receive social security benefits from the country you are posted from. Examples of such benefits are sickness benefit, pension earnings and family benefits. You are, however, entitled to healthcare treatment in the country to which you are posted. As a posted worker, you need to be equipped with form A1 or E101 which serves as proof that you are covered by insurance in the country from which you are posted. For further information you can contact the authorities in the country from which you are posted.

Working in several countries within the Nordic countries without living in one of them

If you work in several countries within the Nordic countries without living in one of them, it is recommended that you contact the authorities in one of the countries where you work or your country of residence for guidance on the procedure for receiving benefits.

Working at sea

If you work onboard a ship, you will normally receive social security benefits only from the country whose flag the ship flies. This is referred to as the flag country. The regulations, types of benefit and benefit rates vary from country to country.  

Working within international transport

If you work as a truck driver, flight crew, on a train, bus etc where you cross national borders within the Nordic countries, your situation will determine in which country you will be insured. You can therefore contact one of the social security authorities for guidance on how you should proceed to receive social security benefits.

Unemployment Insurance

When you start working in Finland, Sweden or Denmark, you need to register with an unemployment benefit fund to become entitled to receive an income-based daily allowance if you become unemployed. In Norway, Iceland, Greenland and the Faroe Islands you will be covered automatically by the unemployment legislation.

Family Members

According to Regulation (EC) No 883/2004, individuals who do not work are covered by social security legislation in the country of residence. The regulation applies to persons moving between EU/EEA countries and Switzerland. The social security of family members is thus determined according to the national legislation of their country of residence. If you have any questions or concerns about your spouse or children’s coverage, please contact one of the social security authorities.

Miscellaneous

If you have any questions or concerns about your or our spouse or children’s coverage, please contact one of the social security authorities. to find out what regulations apply to your particular situation.